Jan 20, 2012

Nuclear Torment '8 Bit Death' review


NUCLEAR TORMENT
'8 Bit Death'
(Self-released)

Making a definitive shift from their wild and sloppy (though promising) crossover influences on the band’s previous demos, Sweden’s video game-obsessed crossover Thrash three-piece, Nuclear Torment, has refined their music and moved toward a much more definitive thrash metal sound, which isn’t to say they still haven’t retained that old recklessness, rather, the band has skimmed the excess mess off the top of their barrel, bringing to light the promising technicality of their thrash influence which, before now, had been muddled by the overwhelmingly sloppy hardcore punk influence, which really, considering the high amount of promise the band displayed in the rawness of these early demos, wouldn’t be at all detrimental to their style and sound if Nuclear Torment didn’t sound so much better as a thrash metal band.
Of course, this isn’t to say the band has dropped these influences completely. Far from it, in fact. Structurally, we can still see the band’s great crossover leanings in the short bursts of aggression and energy that are the tracks on this EP, as well as the use of violent and rhythmic vocal deliveries on “Bruce, the Grave Robbing Brown Bear,” and much of the raw and primitive punk-infused riffing in the beginning of “Sniper Zombie Rape Abortion.”
The title track is where we get the most straight-forward thrash on the album, with its longer song length and it’s abandoning of any punk-ish hook, as well as the abundant mid-paced thrash riffs that dominate the song (think Hyade’s 'The Roots of Thrash'). The lyrical content of this track is also worth mentioning, considering I myself am a collector of older video games, their lyrics, mentioning the NES, Powerglove, and Zapper, were a funny and pleasant surprise in the context of a thrash song. 
Overall, this is a very interesting thrash release in that it shows the very obvious evolution of a band’s sound, creating high-energy thrash metal with all those nice crossover elements weaved in. While not overly ground-breaking or inventive, this three-track debut release ought to provide more than enough pleasure for any fan of thrash or crossover.
(Andrew Oliver) 

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